Archive for the ‘Orphans’ Category

“Surely you are not calling me to do this Lord?”

This thought along with many other thoughts whirled through Emma’s mind when God called him to serve in Egbe in 2011 (click Emma’s Story to read Emma’s personal testimony).

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Pastor James, Emma and Don Fawcett

Emma’s initial calling was to start a Sports Ministry for HELP orphanage both locally in Egbe and as outreach to remote villages in the bush. On one of these outreaches Emma visited a TIV village. The TIV are an ancient tribal group in Nigeria with a very unique culture. This village, over an hour from Egbe, had no church building, no pastor, no resources for sports and little to no education. The need was great.

“Surely you are not calling me to do this Lord?”

Every Saturday Emma would motorcycle out to the village to host a football (soccer) game and to share the gospel using materials like Heart of the Champion. On Sundays he would make the one-hour trek again and attend church with them. Since they had no pastor Emma would often preach.

“My greatest challenge in visiting the TIV camp was taking meals with them. I saw the water they used to cook with and I knew I wouldn’t even clean my clothes with that water. I just prayed and asked God to let my stomach be OK. In all the years I visited the village I never once got sick.”

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Medical Checkup Clinic @ TIV Village

Three years later a team with the Texas Baptist Mission Network visited the TIV village with Emma. Don Fawcett, one of the team members, was deeply touched by the challenges these people faced and returned again with a medical team. They treated many diseases caused by drinking contaminated or dirty water. The team confirmed that two previous village deaths were due to waterborne disease (the chief’s 1st wife and a 10-year-old boy). Don and his team decided to raise the money needed for a well to provide a sustainable source of clean water to protect the lives of this entire community.

Don asked Emma to run the well project. Emma had no experience with managing people, drilling a well or forming a village committee to oversee the well.

“Surely you are not calling me to do this Lord?”

 

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The Digger

Emma says “The challenges began immediately. The machinery got stuck in the sand on our way to the village. Once we finally made it to the village we had people from the nearby town come to extort money from us for basically not giving them a well. Then one of the diggers received a very bad injury above the eye and had to be rushed to the local clinic. The largest challenge was when the drill machine simply would not start. I walked away to pray and then asked the engineer to just try and start it one more time. To both our surprise the machine turned on and started drilling. Once we hit water it became so exciting. The head engineer told me in all his time drilling boreholes he had never drilled a place with water like this one.  He told me this place was very blessed.”

Emma’s ministry to the TIV people has become an outreach department at C.A.R.E. Africa in addition to the monthly Sports Outreach Program Emma conducts in surrounding communities. Emma faces many challenges with this dual ministry such as transport, logistics, equipment and monthly expenses of roughly $250 a month.

Each time God calls us to do the impossible He tells us in 2 Corinthians 9:8 “God is able to bless you abundantly, so that in all things at all times, having all that you need, you will abound in every good work.”

Could this be your “Surely you are not calling me to do this Lord” moment? We hope this story will reach those who will prayerfully consider encouraging Emma by donating to the Sports Outreach Campaign https://give.icareafrica.org/careafrica/sportsoutreach

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Launch of the new well.

IMG_4266Every child should have the best chance for a successful future. But too many children in Nigeria aren’t getting the opportunity to reach their full potential.  These children eventually succumb to begging, lying and stealing to make ends meet because of so many economic barriers in their environment. You can help change that by sponsoring a child through C.A.R.E. Africa. Your sponsorship will give these children the gift of hope and a brighter future.

Nigeria ranks the highest in out-of-school children globally. Even though primary education is officially free and compulsory, about 13.8 million of the country’s children aged 5-14 years are not in school. 

All children, no matter where they live or what their circumstances, have the right to a quality education.  C.A.R.E. Africa supports children through “family based care” which allows them to remain in a family unit.  We provide them with an education and teach them about the saving grace of Jesus Christ.

DSC_0433When you sponsor a child, you achieve a special kind of giving that creates a relationship between you and the community where our C.A.R.E. Africa staff are helping to change the future. Sponsorship provides essential aid and education to the impoverished and improves the well-being of single and double orphans. It gives you the opportunity to see lives transformed. 

We have several children waiting for you. Through child sponsorship, you can be the hero in the life of a child today. You can make sure they grow up healthy, educated, safe and in a family.

Learn more about these beautiful children awaiting sponsorship by clicking on any of their pictures below or visiting our giving webpage at http://give.icareafrica.org

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Why is it that the first question after being introduced is always “so what do you do”?

45328000_10156746330298808_3825232954834026496_nIn the missionary world we are excited to talk about the great things we are involved in and how God is working in our ministry. We list the programs we offer, how many churches we have planted, how many widows, orphans and vulnerable people we have helped.

But we are so much more than what we do…..or are we?

The deceptive attitude that our worth is proportional to our job title or our achievements is predominantly found in Western culture. For the Western worker it means that hard work and more productivity leads to a promotion or a raise. For the missionary it means our accomplishments will lead to increased donations. Somehow our work has become our search for meaning in our life. In the process – many of us have forgotten who we really are and what brings joy to our lives.

Group-of-workersThe cashier, bank teller, missionary, doctor, construction worker and waitress are people with actual lives. They all have passions, goals, struggles, interests, hobbies, families, and qualities that define them and make them who they are. Everyone is more than their job, whether it’s the most admirable career worldwide, or a temporary position. We are all “something” but we are also “someone.” There’s a difference!

 

13416885_10154174756783808_3829576414355949085_oI would like to introduce myself to you.

My American name is Beth Patrice Miles. Beth in Hebrew means house, a strong structure. My Yoruba name is Modupe which means Gratefulness.

I am a child of God, daughter, mother, wife, friend, blogger, deep thinker, prayer warrior, Jesus believer, avid reader, clothing designer, honest to a fault, no filter, baker, coffee lover, innovator, sugar addict, visionary, question asking, exercise loving and don’t reinvent the wheel if someone has already done it -kind of girl.

I am a 3 on the Enneagram (The Achiever) an INFJ (The Advocate) on the Myers Briggs a DIC on the DISC test.

I had a complex childhood and my teenage and college years were not without their problems. I now live in Nigeria with two amazing kids, two dogs and a husband who loves me more than I deserve. My heart is big but there is a wall which only a few have climbed over. I am never satisfied unless I am helping someone or something grow or improve.

Missionary is what I do but I am so much more than that!

Who are you?

John 12:12 ~ child of God.
Ephesians 1:7 ~ forgiven.
John 15:16 ~ chosen.
Romans 6:6~ no longer a slave.
Genesis 1:27 ~ created in the image of God.
Jeremiah 1:5 ~ set apart and appointed.
1 Peter 2:9 ~ royal priesthood, God’s special possession.
John 15:15~ friend of God.
Ephesians 2:10~ God’s handiwork.
Philippians 3:20~ citizen of heaven.
Romans 8:37~ conqueror.
Psalm 139:14 ~ fearfully and wonderfully made.
2 Corinthians 5:17~ a new creation.
Ephesians 1:13 ~ marked with his seal.

Next time you meet someone and they ask you what you do, tell them who you are!

 

Dresses for Orphans

Posted: February 6, 2019 by Patrice Miles in C.A.R.E. Africa, Egbe, Egbe Nigeria, Nigeria, Orphans, People of Egbe, SIM

Almost two years ago on home assignment I had the honor of attending my first CAFO (Christian Alliance for Orphans) conference in Tennessee. It was a wonderful event and one of the vendor’s was Dresses for Orphans https://dressesfororphans.org/.

Dresses For Orphans is an all-volunteer, nonprofit ministry that sews dresses and shirts for orphans worldwide. They want to give an orphan a dress or shirt that has been specially made for them, is new and is something they can keep. They want to make that child feel cared for, special and love and to increase the child’s sense of self-worth – that he or she is a worthy individual valued by God.

Thank you dresses for orphans!!

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Last year we were blessed to have three children graduate from secondary school (high school). In Nigeria, only about 30% of applicants get acceptance to higher institutions due to overcrowding. We did not want our kids sitting idle while waiting on acceptance to a University, so we found apprenticeships in the town.

Michael was able to learn hair barbing and earned his own barbering shears.
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Toyin was able to learn photography and earned his own laptop for editing, camera hopefully to follow.
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Miriam was able to learn hairdressing. 
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We are so proud of them!

Vocational skills like these, will help them at University and afterwards. They are also blessed that their sponsors have helped to support these apprenticeships prayerfully and financially. Here are just a few pictures of them.

Please pray for our graduates.

If you have ever considered supporting a child’s future through sponsorship please visit our giving page to see the children currently in need. give.icareafrica.org.

 

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I will give thanks to you, Lord, with all my heart;
I will tell of all your wonderful deeds.
Psalms 9:1

2018 was a very fruitful year for C.A.R.E. Africa and we give all the thanks and glory to our Lord and Savior! When we look back at our 2018 goals, and check off every single one, our hearts are overflowing with thankfulness to God. Without him stirring people’s hearts to support us prayerfully, financially and physically, none of this would have been possible.

If you followed our blogs you know that 2018 was also a very hard year for us. Spiritually we experienced attacks like never before. Honestly, we were not prepared and that is why 2019 we will be better equipped. Watch for our upcoming blog announcing our 2019 theme and goals for C.A.R.E.

Join us to thank the Lord for what he fulfilled in 2018.
1. Foundations Academy Egbe primary school opened.
2. Monthly sports outreach started.
3. Began weekly Egbe community search for the vulnerable.
4. Three children graduated secondary school and one was accepted to University.
5. First, annual, one-week kids camp held. Three children accepted Christ.
6. First, annual, staff spiritual retreat held in Miango.
7. C.A.R.E. van purchased for children, staff and team transportation.
8. Hired an AWANA director who will also serve in pastoral care.
9. Two USA teams traveled to Egbe. They were instrumental in the school renovation and the TIV outreach.
10. Water well project for TIV camp started.
11. Significant increase in sale of C.A.R.E. products in USA
12. Caregiver microfinance program started. It is designed to support entrepreneurship and alleviate poverty.

As of today we have 55 children and 45 caregivers/foster parents registered in our programs. 

As we continue to walk faithfully please join us in prayer for the new year and new opportunities it will present.

 

DSC_0340At C.A.R.E. Africa we conduct one on one interview sessions with anyone who completes an application and meets our criteria. We use these one on one sessions to evaluate the applicant’s personal character and to see if what they filled out on the application several months ago is the same story they are telling us today. This process helps us separate those who would deceive us from those who are truly vulnerable women and children needing our help. After the interview we visit the home of the applicant. Their living situation will truly tell us if they are in need or not.

DSC_0268 (2)In July of this year C.A.R.E. Africa was conducting one of it’s interview sessions with a woman named Mrs Adeyemi. She had completed an application over a year ago. We had tried to call her but her number wasn’t working. Recently, her son tracked us down and gave us a note that read “Please help me, I want to go to school.” During the interview Mrs Adeyemi and her son were very quiet. Her body looked malnutritioned and her son, Michael, did not look well either. We visited their home and were saddened to see their living conditions. Inside was a 10×10 room that she and her two children slept in. The two mattresses were soaking wet and mold was growing up the walls. The smell was so bad I couldn’t even walk inside. I immediately wanted to take them into our program but at C.A.R.E. Africa we have a policy that we will do more research and pray for 30 days before taking anyone in.

DSC_0271 (2)My staff began their research. Mrs. Adeyemi’s neighbors reported that she would walk up and down the street yelling at them and used abusive language. Another neighbor explained how she was the second wife to a man in Lagos, Nigeria. He occasionally came to visit but didn’t take care of her or the children. We even heard that her husband was bringing marijuana for her to sell in Egbe. Overall the reports were not good and our staff were reconsidering taking her and Michael in.

What would people in the town say about C.A.R.E. Africa if they knew we were supporting a woman who shouted at her neighbors and sold marijuana?

What would our supporters think of their donations to our ministry if they heard about this woman?

Should we help them?

When consulting one of our Reverends in Egbe about the situation we were encouraged by his words. “You should definitely help her! She has probably never been shown Christ’s love before. You don’t know what this gift of support will do to her character and heart.”

b7157fe1-537c-4294-9f2f-7737925d0087We are happy to say that God has been using C.A.R.E. Africa and three sponsors to show Christ’s love to the Adeyemi family. We were able to fix up the 10 x 10 room they live in, buy new mattresses and bed posts, fix the roof so water will not enter into the room and also fix Mrs. Adeyemi’s grinding machine so she can be empowered. Michael is in school now and doing well and we will mentor and disciple his mother. Please pray for Mrs. Adeyemi that thru this ministry she will hear the gospel message and know that Jesus Christ loved her and died for her so that she might truly live! This is a story of the real Christmas message. Thank-you for us make this happen.

Have you thought about sponsoring a child or a family? Please consider 2019 to be the year to do so. Visit our giving page at https://give.icareafrica.org to see all the children in need. Bose is our most emergency situation as her family needs sponsorship ASAP. You can visit her page at https://give.icareafrica.org/careafrica/bose