Archive for the ‘Lenny Miles’ Category

IMG_0070 2

 

 

Wow! I cannot believe we have been in America for 6 months already!

IMG_6965Jolie, what is the best thing about being back in America?
1. Air Conditioning in my school.
2. A real school cafeteria with food.
3. The dinners you cook us at night.
(She is definitely my daughter, everything relates to food!)

 

IMG_3484Jolie, What do you miss about Nigeria.
1. I miss my friends, Caitlyn and Lowena
2. I am sad I will miss SIM Spiritual Life Conference in January.

 

 

IMG_6365Cason, what is the best thing about being back in America?
1. I love American school and making straight A’s now.
2. I love how much there is to do.
3. I love having all types of food options to eat.

 

IMG_0093Cason, what do you miss about Nigeria?
1. My friend Jephthah.
2. I miss having Jollof Rice all the time.
3. Freedom to do whatever and no rules.

 

IMG_6218Lenny, what is the best thing about being back in America?
1. Love having hobbies again like hunting.
2. More activities to do as a family and couple.
3. Being around my family again.

 

IMG_4582Lenny, what do you miss about Nigeria?
1. Food, Egusi & Pounded Yam!
2. Miss the missionary community.
3. Rainy season.

 

IMG_7789Patrice, what is the best thing about being back in America?
1. Food, Food, Food and more Food! (Doughnuts, cakes, cookies, real chocolate oh my!)
2. Seeing my kids joy as they play sports and are involved in different programs.
3. Hanging out and catching up with all my family and friends.
4. The participation and involvement from family, friends and strangers in C.A.R.E. Africa!

 

IMG_2368Patrice, what do you miss about Nigeria?
1. Food, Egusi & Pounded Yam.
2. Driving around with my driver, Samuel, on all our adventures in the crazy city.
3. Jumai, who helped me clean, cook and shop.
4. Those deep conversations with like minded missionaries who lived and breathed the same trials and tribulations we did.
5. My Nigerian brother and sister, Emma and Tofunmi.
6. Having to rely on God every day to just get from Point A to Point B in anything and everything I did.

“So What’s Next?”

Our family has been hugely blessed the past two and half months on home assignment re-connecting with our family and catching up on everything we had missed the past two years. During this time we met with SIM and our home church. After wise counsel we have decided that our next two year term will be stateside. We are praying you will continue to walk with us through our next two years of ministry.

family

Polsgrove Family Reunion

So what does this look like for Miles In Missions and our supporters?

For Miles in Missions: The next two years I (Patrice) will remain a full time missionary with SIM. I will travel to Nigeria several times a year. My goal is to grow the ministry both in Nigeria and stateside. I will continue in my roll as sponsorship manager for the orphans along with donor relations, marketing, empowerment and accounting. We will set up house in Louisville, KY and Lenny will do re modeling jobs to supplement our income. The kids are enrolled at Portland Christian school and start classes August 15th.

For our supporters: If you are currently donating through SIM and or C.A.R.E. Africa, we ask that you prayerfully continue. The ministry continues to grow as more orphans and caregivers come on board. This growth is a blessing from God but adds additional expenses. This is why your continued support is critical. 

*C.A.R.E. Africa currently has 60 orphans and 55 caregivers enrolled in our programs with more on the waiting list.

*AWANA Egbe hosts over 150 kids every Monday.

46773a43-6a66-4618-9e60-fb7ba7346d47*Foundations Academy Egbe has been open for almost one year now and we currently have 58 children attending. The current building is already too small so we have found 25 acres of land but will need to raise around $7,000 for the purchase plus an additional $250,000 for the building of the elementary, middle and high school, chapel, administrative offices, medical clinic, hostel, guesthouse, soccer pitch and sports buildings.

*Emma Salako (C.A.R.E. Africa CEO and co founder) will be attending seminary school part time for the next 4-5 years for youth ministry.

*TITI, our Nigerian daughter, has completed one year at Lancaster Bible College with academic excellence and has three more years to go.

*Spring of Life HIV/AIDS clinic continues to rely solely on donations to run the center as all government funding has been non-existent. In addition Pastor Alabi has been invited to attend a new SIM gathering in South Africa for all the HIV/AIDS ministries across the world.

All of these programs would not be possible without your donations and cannot continue without your much needed support. Thank you for continuing down this road with Miles In Missions. We will keep you updated on our progress.

If you are not currently a supporter and would like to join us on this next chapter please click http://bit.ly/milesgive

60763962_10157244350938808_6636318487771873280_n

 

“It’s time to go home.”

Those were the words my husband said to me one morning after returning from a Men’s retreat. I thought he was joking and when I realized he wasn’t, I became angry and hurt. For 48hrs I didn’t shower, barely ate and I wrestled with God. I questioned everything I believed in, my faith, my marriage, my motherhood and my life. At some point I reluctantly handed over my ego and my superwoman cape. I sat at God’s feet and just started to breathe Him in. I realized that I had been drowning under my own skin. Throughout my life God has always picked me up before I self-destructed and I realized that He was saving me from myself once again.

simkidsHe opened my eyes to the fact that my amazing son has just two years left to prepare for college and doesn’t know how to go to the grocery store, manage a checking account, drive a car, clean his own clothes, cook a meal or simply clean a toilet. My beautiful daughter has art and musical gifts that she craves to learn more about and our environment had limited resources to help her. My loyal husband, who has supported my work with C.A.R.E. Africa for 6 years, has a body ravaged with sickness that needed to heal physically as well as emotionally. Then there was me… I was so stressed from trying to raise money for C.A.R.E. Africa without ever having face-to-face time with our loyal donors or the opportunity to build new relationships that I felt the stress in the base of my neck daily.

 

superpatriceGod first, family second and work/ministry last. Once again I realized my priorities were skewed. Everyone around me was struggling including myself. It hurt to realize that all my superhuman powers had failed to save everyone. When I slowed down and breathed God in, He reminded me that He gave me wings to fly – not a superwoman cape. It was time to let go.

So what does this mean for our family and our ministries in Nigeria? It means God is in control and we are not. We are excited about this next chapter and how God is going to show off. I am eager to see my family flourish and C.A.R.E. Africa bloom into the beautiful flower God wants it to become. Stay tuned to our next blog as we give more details on our time in the U.S.A.

It’s home assignment time again! So, what exactly is home assignment?

cousingirlsCason says “ It’s when we take a break from missionary work and visit family and friends and get to relax.” Jolie says “It’s our time we spend with our family and have fun.”

I am sure it looks different for every missionary family. This will be our third home assignment as we complete six years in Nigeria. The last two home assignments were very stressful as both times we arrived with a financial deficit of over $2,000 a month. This deficit meant we had to spend our home assignment fundraising at a high level before we could return to Nigeria.

IMG_6401In between the fundraising we tried to find time for:
1. Family and friends.
2. Needed doctor visits
3. Needed dentist visits
4. Restock on personal supplies for Nigeria.
5. Counseling, debriefing and spiritual renewal
6. Rest
7. New donors
8. Collecting resources for the ministry.
9. Shopping for needed clothing for the family
10. Eating everything we wouldn’t be able to have again for another two years.

We are blessed that this home assignment we are not arriving with a financial deficit. This will allow breathing room for more time reconnecting with family and friends, resting and re-envisioning what God wants for our family for the next two year term.

God has made it very clear that for the health and vitality of our family this home assignment needs to be longer than the chaotic three months spent on the road. We don’t know exactly what that looks like. We are asking you to pray along with us for clarity as to God’s plans for “Miles In Missions”. The video we made below will more fully explain the journey God has us on. Home assignment here we come!

Screen Shot 2019-04-02 at 1.41.28 PM

 

 

Engage

Posted: December 6, 2018 by Patrice Miles in Lenny Miles, Miles In Missions, Mission Trip, Missionaries, Nigeria, Prayer, SIM

Have you felt led to becoming a missionary but wanted to experience it short term before committing your life to it? Check out the latest SIM video by my amazing husband. We would love to have you or anyone you know come for an internship with our Engage program. Click the picture below to watch.

Screen Shot 2018-12-06 at 12.41.55 PM

goDSC_0018 (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s kinda crazy to think we have been living in Nigeria for 5 years now! God has been so good and we have learned so much. From the revitalization of Egbe hospital, to C.A.R.E. Africa’s birth, AWANA Nigeria in Egbe, C.A.R.E. craft shows, our own kids growing a foot or two, Ebola, spiritual battles, malaria and other illnesses, weddings, moving from Egbe to Jos, Lenny’s new role as SIM Communication Specialist, additions to our family (animal and human) and now an opening of a primary school….. God has been faithful! Nigeria is home now and we are excited to see what else he has in store for our family.

Egbe Hospital Re BuildDSC_0216

 

DSC_0003

Started w/ 2 Kids

 

dsc_1173

50 Children Now

DSC_0412

AWANA

care booth 4

C.A.R.E. Craft Shows

DSC_0722

Emma & Tofunmi’s Wedding

img_6402
img_6668cb2IMG_2286

 

Medical Results

Posted: July 28, 2018 by Lenny in Jos Nigeria, Lenny Miles, Miles In Missions, Nigeria, Prayer, SIM
IMG_4818

Panoramic photo of a nearby beach. Simply amazing!

I’m glad to be back home, but Cape Town is an amazingly beautiful place where I could stay for a long time. Not having my family there made it completely boring though. I was expecting to have to stay there longer, but thankfully the healthcare system in South Africa is amazing and the Doctor had everything planned for me ahead of time.

IMG_4893

Selfie at the Hospital

I left Nigeria on a Monday, arrived in South Africa on Tuesday, and saw the Doctor for the first time on Wednesday. He planned for me to be admitted to the hospital the next day for an overnight stay and would have all my testing done right away. Everything went so amazingly fast that I was done with everything by 4:00pm and I didn’t even have to stay the night at the hospital! The following Monday I met with the doctor for the results (explained below) and the results were so good that I had no reason to stay in South Africa as long as I had originally expected. I called the airlines and changed my tickets for Wednesday and made it back home to Nigeria a full 10 days ahead of time.

IMG_1400

Hospital Room

As far as my health, it’s all great news. I’m am very healthy… Praise God! The only health concerns are… Gastritis and High Cholesterol causing a “fatty liver”.

An ultrasound found that my liver is a little big and they call it a fatty liver. The doctor told me, without having seen the blood tests results yet, that it is most likely caused by high cholesterol and the blood test results later confirmed it. My cholesterol is elevated, but not bad enough to treat with medicine. A change of diet and exercise should help all of this in some time.

IMG_2916

Dr. Office

Next, they did the gastroscopy and found no ulcers, took some biopsies, and found that I have gastritis which is inflammation of the stomach lining, but no cancers, etc. It can be caused by diet, but the doctor and I think it could be a result of long-term use of ibuprofen or the combination of the two.

Thats it.

As far as malaria, the doctor and I are in agreement that there is no way I actually had malaria that many times. He suspects that I was sick each time, but it was most likely a false positive or poor lab technician giving the wrong diagnoses and I was actually sick with something else giving many of the same symptoms of malaria. The doctor basically said that just as one person is allergic to poison ivy and another isn’t or that seasonal allergies affect some while others not at all, is most likely how my body is different in fighting small bugs and infections from most other expats in our field. The gastritis could also be contributing to my symptoms producing diarrhea, nausea, and cramping. They did a test to see if malaria is in my blood down to the molecular level. They found none and that means that it is not living in my liver and not lying dormant. I have no malaria in my blood. He does want me to change to a different medicine for preventing malaria.

IMG_3869

New Testament in Afrikaans at Dr.’s office

They checked my liver, kidneys, gallbladder, and other major organs with ultrasound and combined with blood tests, everything is functioning normally. My immune system is fine. They tested for Schistosomiasis and it is negative. Stool given is completely clean (oxygen-moron?) no parasites or bad bacteria.

The doctors biggest takeaway from our discussions was that in my history I mentioned that I am never sick when I am away from Nigeria. He kept saying, “It’s your environment”. This is when he explained that my body acts differently to the normal things of Nigeria that other people’s bodies tolerate easily. It is just what each of us is genetically predisposed to handling with our immune systems.

We are extremely thankful that our health insurance with SIM is great. When being treated outside of the USA they cover 100% of the medical costs. If I had come to the USA for treatment, there would have been a large deductible in addition to all travel costs.

That’s really the best summary I can give. Thank you all for your prayers during this time. We appreciate all of you and once again your prayers have worked for our family!

Here are some extra pictures of my trip…

IMG_9504

View just outside the driveway of the house I stayed in.

IMG_8154

Table Mountain. One of the 7 Wonders of Nature in the world.

IMG_7924

Sunset in Cape Town

IMG_7090

Another view of Table Mountain. This just a block away from the house I stayed.

IMG_5913

My rental car. Tiny, but it was brand new.

IMG_5496

Got to put my toes in the sand.

IMG_3103

One of the dinners I cooked for myself. Can anyone say “High Cholesterol”?

IMG_4037

Crystal clear nights and the moon.

IMG_1688

One of the dinners I cooked for myself. Can anyone say “High Cholesterol”?

IMG_2241

Dishes for a single guy.

IMG_0312

My nice room for the stay.